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Planting

Row Width

Row widths of 70–75 cm (28–30 in.) are standard for both white and large-seeded coloured beans when the crop will be pulled and windrowed. In fields with a high risk of white mould, wide row widths are preferred to allow more air circulation in the canopy. Narrow row widths of 36–56 cm (14–22 in.) are…Continue readingRow Width

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Planting

Seeding Rate

Dry edible bean seed size varies greatly. Check to ensure the planter is calibrated properly to plant the correct number of seeds per meter of row. Adjust seeding rates for seed quality and expected germination rate, field conditions and field history. In conditions where reduced emergence is a risk, increase seeding rates by up to…Continue readingSeeding Rate

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Planting

Seeding Depth

A seeding depth of 4–6 cm (1.5–2.5 in.) is normal, but deeper plantings of up to 9 cm (3.5 in.) may be necessary to seed into moisture. At minimum, planting depth should be at least 1.2 cm (0.5 in.) into soil moisture. The seeding depth for dry edible beans is critical for uniform emergence. Frequently,…Continue readingSeeding Depth

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Planting

Planting Date

Generally speaking, early June is the best time to plant dry beans. Planting should occur after the risk of spring frost has past and when there is not a risk of heavy rain after planting. The ideal germination temperature for dry edible beans is 15°C or above. The table below displays the ideal planting dates…Continue readingPlanting Date

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Planting

Seed Quality

Using high-quality, pedigreed seed from inspected fields is important to promote early season vigour and reduce the risk of seed-borne disease. Bacterial blights, anthracnose and BCMV are seed-borne diseases that cause serious issues in some years. Most coloured bean seed (except black bean seed) is imported from arid growing regions in the U.S. where there…Continue readingSeed Quality

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Planting

Inoculation

The species of rhizobia for dry edible beans is Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar phaseoli. Dry edible beans are less efficient at fixing nitrogen through rhizobia than soybeans or other legumes. Inoculation trials and routine use of an inoculant have not shown an economic advantage in Ontario, even though other regions do suggest inoculant use for virgin…Continue readingInoculation

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Planting

Stand Assessments and Replant Decisions

An adequate stand of dry edible beans is a minimum of two-thirds to three- quarters of a full stand. Dry edible beans have a limited ability to branch and compensate Continue readingStand Assessments and Replant Decisions

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Planting

Plant Development

Bean varieties are characterized by their growth habit. Indeterminate plants continuously grow and exhibit long vines. Most of the commonly grown bean types have a semi-determinate growth habit, meaning they continue to grow after flowering begins and develop short to long vines. Determinate types tend to flower and ripen over a short period. Determinate types…Continue readingPlant Development

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Planting

Ontario Labs Offering Custom Seed Germination Testing

Laboratories are accredited by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). Laboratories marked with * are also accredited to test for seed purity. Canadian Seed Laboratories Ltd.* P.O. Box 217 208 St. David St. Lindsay, ON K9V 5Z4 Tel: (705) 328-1648 Fax: (705) 324-2550 Canadian Seed Laboratories Ltd. is also accredited to do some seed disease…Continue readingOntario Labs Offering Custom Seed Germination Testing

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Planting

Dealing with Soil Crusting

Pounding rains from thunderstorms can result in severe crusting on heavy soil types, or soils with poor aggregate stability, and can inhibit bean emergence, particularly if hot, dry conditions bake the soil surface. Soil loosening and aeration may be required. There is no advantage to waiting once a crust has been identified. Waiting may increase…Continue readingDealing with Soil Crusting